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CERN and the Mandela Effect

We continue to receive numerous emails and letters concerning CERN and the Mandela Effect changing words in the King James Bible. We will attempt to cover some of the verses that continue to pop up.

Matthew 6:11 “in earth” vs “on earth”

The Latin Vulgate reads: “in caelo et in terra”

The 1389 Wycliffe translation: “be thi wille don as in heuen and in earthe”

The 1526 Tyndale translation: “thy wyll be fulfilled as well in erth as hit ys in heven”

The 1611 King James Version: Thy will be done, in earth, as it is in heauen”

In the 1549, 1662, and 1772 versions of the Anglican Book of Common Prayer all state “in” earth.

The words “debts” and “debtors” in Matthew 6:12 in the original Greek are “opheilEmata” (owes) and “opheiletais” (owers) which is different from “trespasses” in verses 14 and 15 which is “paraptOmata” (offenses).

Matthew 7:1 – the only version that I have found that reads “lest” is the Orthodox Jewish Bible, all the other translations say “that”.

Matthew 9:17; Mark 2:22; Luke 5:37, 38 – bottles – the 1389 Wycliffe translation, the 1582 Douay-Rheims translation both use “bottles”; the 1526 Tyndale translation uses “vessels”; and of course the 1611 King James Version uses “bottles.” The 1828 Webster’s American Dictionary of the English Language defines bottles as: A hollow vessel of glass, wood, leather or other material, with a narrow mouth, for holding and carrying liquors. The oriental nations use skins or leather for the conveyance of liquors; and of this kind are the bottles mentioned in scripture. “Put new wine into bottles.”

In Luke 17:34 & 35 the words “men” and “women” are not in the original Greek, it just says “duo” or two. However the Greek words have a specific gender, the one in verse 34 is an “Adjective, pronominal cardinal nominative masculine plural” – in verse 35 it is “feminine plural” – in essence two men and two women.

In Luke 19:23 – 27 it is not Jesus commanding His disciples to bring His enemies before Him so He can slay them. This is ending of the parable that Christ was giving to His disciples. Jesus never gave a directive to His disciples in a parable, they were used for teachings.

Luke 20:24 – again, the older translations use the word “penny”.

John 12:24 – the Wycliffe, Tyndale, and KJV Bibles use “corn of wheat” Webster’s Dictionary tells us that the word “corn” comes from the Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German & Old Norse korn grain, Latin granum. And it means: a: the seeds of a cereal grass and especially of the important cereal crop of a particular region (as wheat in Britain, oats in Scotland and Ireland, and Indian corn in the New World and Australia) b: the kernels of sweet corn served as a vegetable while still soft and milky. So the word “corn” can mean “seed” and not just the modern concept of kernels of corn.

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